Making Modern Batiks

That's the title of the lecture I'm giving to the Tulsa Modern Quilt Guild this Thursday. Having given this lecture before, I thought a quick scan of previous images would refresh my memory and allow me to make a few notes updating the topic. I was wrong.

First, it's been a while since I've given this lecture and a lot of dye has passed under the bridge or into the baths. Also, my business model has changed in big ways, but, it happened over several years, so I  almost didn't notice it.  These shifts prompt me to ask what's changed and what is constant in my work?

Not surprisingly, me still being me, some things have remained the same and I thought I'd use today's post to highlight those, focusing on the changes tomorrow. In other words, I'm using this blog to prep my lecture. Thanks in advance for listening/reading.

Here's what I still do:

Make patterning using wax resist.

 I no longer use carrots to make this pattern, but, a carrot does make a fine circle.

I no longer use carrots to make this pattern, but, a carrot does make a fine circle.

I'm still melting wax, though now just beeswax as opposed to a mixture of paraffin and beeswax and dipping a variety of tools to create patterned fabric.

 A rainbow of finished fabrics on their way to a new home.

A rainbow of finished fabrics on their way to a new home.

I'm still (currently) primarily making quilting cotton. 

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I'm still using my hand dyes to design for magazines and books. The above images were both featured in Modern Patchwork Magazine in the past few years.

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I'm still experimenting with integrating my fabrics into my another sewing passion, making garments.

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I'm still and, hopefully, always answering the question, "What can I make with this fabric?"